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MONTMARTRE I 1928 Hand Signed Etching with Watercolor by Louis Icart

Item Number: 500434

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Availability: in stock
$ 5,500.97

Description:

This is a Hand Signed, Original Dry Point Etching on paper with hand water-coloring by World Famous and listed artist Louis Icart titled "Montmartre I". This piece is hand signed by the artist in the lower right margin. It was published in 1928 as part of a limited edition. The estate frame measures 29.5"h x 21.5"w Louis Justin Laurent Icart (1890 - 1950) was born in Toulouse, France. Toulouse was the home of many prominent writers and artists, including Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. Icart entered the Ecole Superieure de Commerce de Toulouse University in order to continue his studies for a career in business, particularly banking (his father's profession). However, he soon discovered the play writings of Victor Hugo (1802-1885), which were to change the course of his life. Icart borrowed whatever books he could find by Hugo at the Toulouse library, devouring the tales, rich in both romantic imagery and the dilemmas of the human condition. It was through Icart's love of the theater that he developed a taste for all the arts. It was not until his move to Paris in 1907 that Icart would concentrate on painting, drawing and the production of countless beautiful etchings, which have served to preserve his name in twentieth century art history. Art Deco, a term coined at the 1925 Paris Exposition des Arts Decratifs, had taken its grip on the Paris of the 1920s. By the late 1920s Icart, working for both publications and major fashion and design studios, had become very successful, both artistically and financially. His etchings reached their height of brilliance in the Art Deco era, and Icart became the symbol of the epoch. Yet, although Icart has created for us a picture of Paris life in the 1920s and 1930s, he worked in his own style, derived principally from the study of eighteenth-century French masters such as Jean Antoine Watteau, Francis Boucher and Jean Honore Fragonard. In 1914 Icart had met an effervescent eighteen-year-old blonde named Fanny Volmers, at the time an employee of the fashion house Paquin. She became his wife and a source of artistic inspiration for the rest of his life.